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Thursday October 30, 2014
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He has a plan!

Straw dogs

My brother and his gun-advocate friends are freaking out over the Supreme Court's "straw" purchase decision:

A divided Supreme Court sided with gun control groups and the Obama administration Monday, ruling that the federal ban on "straw" purchases of guns can be enforced even if the ultimate buyer is legally allowed to own a gun.

[. . .]

The ruling settles a split among appeals courts over federal gun laws intended to prevent sham buyers from obtaining guns for the sole purpose of giving them to another person. The laws were part of Congress' effort to make sure firearms did not get into the hands of unlawful recipients.

Writing for the majority, Justice Elena Kagan said the federal government's elaborate system of background checks and record-keeping requirements help law enforcement investigate crimes by tracing guns to their buyers. Those provisions would mean little, she said, if a would-be gun buyer could evade them by simply getting another person to buy the gun and fill out the paperwork.

Wayne, for example, asks if this means he can't buya weapon for his children or grandchildren and must buy them a gift certificate instead. Well, yes, Wayne, it means exactly that. The case the court ruled on involved a Virginia man who bought a gun with the intention of transferring it to a relative in Pennsylvania who was not prohibited from owning firewarms.

Wayne and Larry both talk about government overreach (Wayne says "runaway overreach" that might never be undone), and here I take issue a little. It's true that overreach is a big problem, by all three branches in any number of areas. But on the specific of the Supreme Court and guns, I think we've been doing pretty well lately. It wasn't so long ago that the court deemed the right to bear arms an individual one, never mind all the hot air about militias, and this anti-gun ruling seems to be the exception rather than a piece of an overall trend.

But eternal vigilance is a must. Here, for example, is Hillary Clinton:

 

Asked about guns during her CNN town hall Tuesday, Hillary Clinton stated that “we cannot let a minority of people — and that’s what it is, it is a minority of people — hold a viewpoint that terrorizes the majority of people.”

It's terrorizing people by insisting that the Constitution be followed by allowing Americans the ability to defend themselves? On which planet is that, exactly?

And here's an editorial in that freedom-loving Journal Gazette:

 

Future historians will be puzzled why what was once one of the most technologically advanced, enlightened societies in history aspired to ascend to such a high level of everyday wariness.

They will marvel at how virtually unlimited access to and display of firearms was pushed upon a reluctant majority by a relatively tiny group of particularly vocal and politically organized zealots.

They will find it particularly ironic that the unlimited-guns advocates so effectively used the concept of “freedom” to justify their cause.

As the future historians will see – as anyone who lived in one of those other places or times when guns were truly an essential part of daily life could have told us – no one is less free than a man, woman or child who must live in constant fear of death.

The headline on the piece -- I kid you not -- is "gun lust costing us freedom." In their demendted minds, it is not gun-wielding thugs and loons that make us constantly fear death but the ordinary people who decide to give themselves the ability to thwart the thugs and loons.

 

Comments

Larry Morris
Wed, 06/18/2014 - 10:21am

Freaking out?  Yes, I guess you could say that. 

Ask any legal expert, the "straw purchase" laws were all originally intended to deal with people purchasing firearms for people who otherwise would not qualify to purchase one themselves. 

Pick, pick, pick ... it's just a little thing, but it's one little thing after another, after another and all at once it's a big thing that I worry about.  Remember the story about the frog in the boiling water?  Throw a frog into a pot of boiling water and he will immediately jump right out.  But, put him into a pot of cool water and slowly bring it to a boil and he'll sit there and eventually die. 

It's such a little thing, after all we've made such gains ...

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