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Opening Arguments

That's some pause

The only thing we know for certain is that we can't know anything for certain. Unless, of course, you're one of those reality deniers:

The 17-year pause in global warming is likely to last into the 2030s and the Arctic sea ice has already started to recover, according to new research.

A paper in the peer-reviewed journal Climate Dynamics – by Professor Judith Curry of the Georgia Institute of Technology and Dr Marcia Wyatt – amounts to a stunning challenge to climate science orthodoxy.

Not only does it explain the unexpected pause, it suggests that the scientific majority – whose views are represented by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) – have underestimated the role of natural cycles and exaggerated that of greenhouse gases. 


The research comes amid mounting evidence that the computer models on which the IPCC based the gloomy forecasts of a rapidly warming planet in its latest report, published in September, are diverging widely from reality.
No, I don't cite this one study as absolute proof that there is no such thing as climate change or that, if there is, mankind didn't cause it. But it is a reminder to all the warmists that sciece is about skepticism in search of truth, not declaring that the search can end because the "issue is settled." Nothing is ever settled in science.

Global warming is a little like Obamacare. Once the reality becomes obvious and does not act as the model predicted, it is time to question the model, not deny the reality.


Comments

Larry Morris
Tue, 11/05/2013 - 12:14pm

I don't deny there are global warming issues.  And I don't disagree that we (mankind) have had something to do with it.  I just have never been on the side that said that's the ONLY reason.  Just as with everything else, the more we think we know, the less we really do. 

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