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Opening Arguments

Resistance

On March 20, DelRea Good was driving olone on a dark country road in Porter County when a police officer, who had clocked her at 54 mph in a 35 mph zone, tried to pull her over. She waved to the officer, slowed down, put on her hazard lights and proceeded to a well-lit Kohl's parking lot less than a mile down the road. A wise move, right? Woman driving alone at night, anything could happen. Wrong:

Green vs. green

Want to see a really good case of cognitive dissonance? Just ask one of those Gaia Movement freaks to read this:

It's takeback time

Here we go again:

Kentucky Republican Sen. Rand Paul told a raucous crowd in Louisville, Kentucky on Tuesday that he will build his presdiential campaign on 'a message that is loud and clear, and does not mince words: We have come to take our country back.'

Conventional wisdom

I've done a blog post or two (and a few editorials) in support of the calling of a constitutional convention. There have been various proposals for what it should tackle, but the one gaining traction is to convene one to craft a balanced budget amendment. So far, legislators in 27 states have passed applications for the convention, and activists are pushing for new applications in nine other states where Republicans control both chambers of the legislature.

Whole new world

We all know about Dear John letters. Now we have the Dear John Facebook post:

A Brooklyn woman scored a judge’s approval to legally change her relationship status to “single” via Facebook.

In a landmark ruling, Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Matthew Cooper is allowing a nurse named Ellanora Baidoo to serve her elusive husband with divorce papers via a Facebook message.

Don't need no stinkin' permit

I've mention a few times year that Indiana has even looser gun laws than Texas. Well, Kansas now has both of us beat:

This is protection?

Stupid kids have been doing stupid things since the beginning of time. There should be a better way to handle it than making stupidity a crime:

Word power

Interesting words I encountered while wandering through the blogosphere.

obloquy (OB-luh-kwee), n. -- discredit, abuse or bad repute resulting from public blame, abuse or denunciation, as in: "Indiana has been showered with obloquy this week by sneering liberal elites."

Nice tat, private

The times, the are a changin':

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — A newly revised tattoo policy that will remove the limit on the number and size of soldiers' tattoos is coming very soon, Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno said Wednesday.

Smart diplomacy

Can we take a break from the great RFRA freakout for a moment to think a little about something a tad bit more serious?

It is amazing -- indeed, staggering -- that so few Americans are talking about what it would mean for the world's biggest sponsor of international terrorism, Iran, to have nuclear bombs, and to be developing intercontinental missiles that can deliver them far beyond the Middle East.

Google dummies

Don't think you're such hot stuff just because you know how to use a search engine:

Search engines like Google or Yahoo make people think they are smarter than they actually are because they have the world's knowledge at their fingertips, psychologists at Yale University have found.

Posted in: Web/Tech

The free range days are gone

Sad but true: We've allowed our neighborhoods to become so dangerous we can't just let our kids be kids anymore.

I'm a new father. Like many new parents, I've been giving a lot of thought to how I want to raise my child. And just as this became my life's primary mission, there emerged this phenomenon of "free range kids." An anti-helicopter parenting movement was just what I wanted.

The IRS forever

Yeah, he's probably right, but he doesn't have to sound so smug about it:

The IRS commissioner on Tuesday brushed aside GOP proposals to abolish his agency, insisting the U.S. would have to have a tax collector one way or another. 

“You can call them something other than the IRS if that made you feel better,” the agency’s chief, John Koskinen, said after a speech at the National Press Club.

Oh, look, a squirrel!

You have to get used to a certain amount of posturing in this business, just accept that a lot of the people you're talking to are saying things just for effect. But honestly, the posturing in the last week over Indiana's Religious Freedom Restoraion Act has become insufferable.

Against death, period

This is interesting. Liberal and conservative Catholics disagree on abortion, same-sex marriage and a lot of other things. But there might be an anti-death penalty consensus developing, or at least emerging.

The great RFRA freakout

My goodness. Indiana sort of got real famous real fast, huh? If we get verbally firebombed by one more preening liberal or boycotted by one more airheaded CEO, we might as well roll up our tent and go home, huh? Kinda the point, I'm guessing.

In case you dont feel like reading through the avalanche of stories about our passage of RFRA, I've picked two that seem representative.

Gotcha, Bowe

Obviously the Bowe Bergdahl deal was a bad trade. In return for five terrorists, four of whom are expected to rejoin the fight, we got a deserter, and several men were killed trying to find the worthless piece of crap. But at least the military has ignored all the poltical hoopla from the White House and seems (surprisingly) to be doing the right thing:

I've looked at life from both sides now

The "religious freedom" act heading to the governor's desk provides a good case study of how polarized we've become.

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